Could Your Dog Be A Senior?

senior dog

There are countless articles and books on puppy care, but considerably less advice is available about caring for senior dogs. Senior dogs are wonderful, special beings and they have earned their right to enjoy a comfortable life, yet sadly many senior dogs are left to fend for themselves when they outgrow their cuteness.

Older dogs comprise a considerable part of animal shelters because many people simply do not want to adopt senior dogs. Even those of us who lovingly vow to care for our dogs from puppyhood to old age often miss the signs (or unintentionally refuse to believe) that our precious pups are reaching their golden years.

Tips For Traveling With Your Dog


Summer is here and the heat is on, but that doesn’t mean you have to hide out at home. Whether you’re a beach or a mountain lover, you can bring your dog along if you have the right know-how and gadgets to keep her/him cool and protected.

After all, a family vacation isn’t a family vacation unless your best furry friend comes along for the adventure. Yett travel can be stressful for pets and owners alike. Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM offers must-have advice on the ‘have pet, will travel’ revolution!

Do your research: Sites like petswelcome.com and bringfido.com are great resources for locating pet friendly hotels, campgrounds, B&B’s, and even pet sitters all across the United States.

Plan ahead: make sure you get clearance from your vet that your pet is healthy enough to travel. Make sure he is up to date with his shots and that you’ve taken preventative measures against common pests like fleas, ticks, worms, etc. If traveling to another state or by plane, you will need a health certificate from your vet 10-30 days prior to travel. Make sure his ID tags are up to date and legible. Dr. Carol recommends having one tag with your home address and another with your destination address.

Consider your pet’s snout: Snub-nosed animals, like American Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Pugs, Shar-Peis, and Persian cats (aka Brachycephalic animals) should never fly in the cargo hold, as they are particularly sensitive to respiratory difficulties in flight.

Mind your manners: Basic obedience training is a must. Your dog should know basic commands and be consistent in following directions. Be mindful of excessive barking or aggressive behavior. Be courteous and tip well. The goal is to make sure that you and your pet are welcome back anytime.

Avoiding trouble: If you know that your pet is nervous by nature, traveling can be extremely overwhelming. Bach’s 5 Flower Rescue Remedy is an all-natural way to sooth your pet’s nerves and avoid overly stressful situations. If you pet becomes motion sick, bring along some ginger cookies to help settle the stomach.

Must Have Gadgets For Traveling With Your Dog:
Remote feeders and toys: There are several ingenious new gadgets that will amuse and exercise your pet while you’re away and let owners feed their pets from afar.

Babies Who Grow Up With Pets Have Less Allergies



Having a pet is good for your baby, says a study
 out of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Researchers at the hospital studied nearly 500 babies in large cities, such as New York and Boston and tracked their health, along with allergen and bacteria levels in their homes.

The study found that babies who were exposed to pets within the first year of life were less likely to suffer from asthma and allergies than those babies who were exposed after age one. It also found that babies exposed to cockroaches and mouse dander were less likely to suffer from wheezing by age three.

What is Breed Specific Legislation?

breed specific legislation pit bull

By Amanda Sullivan

What is breed specific legislation?


Most dog lovers probably know how pit bulls unjustly get a bad rap but many people still do not know about breed specific legislation (BSL), which impacts countless dogs and their owners. According to the ASPCA, BSL is defined as “the blanket term for laws that either regulate or ban certain dog breeds in an effort to decrease dog attacks on humans and other animals.” 

BSL largely discriminates against dogs that fall under the pit bull classification however, there have been BSL enacted against American Bulldogs, Rottweilers, Mastiffs, Dalmatians, Chow Chows, German Shepherds, Doberman Pinschers, any mix of these breeds, and even dogs who resemble these breeds. Today more than 700 U.S. cities have enacted breed-specific laws.

Feel the Heat: 10 Potentially Hazardous Summer Hotspots for Pets


“Having your furry family members tag along on summer vacation is becoming more popular with pet owners, but it also adds an extra level of responsibility,” says Dr. Jennifer Maniet, DVM. “Just be sure to prioritize your pets’ needs when making your plans. Make sure they will have access to plenty of clean water, shady places to cool down, and above all else, constant supervision. Summer goes by quickly and the last thing you want is to spend time and money treating potentially avoidable medical emergencies.”

Here are some common summertime risks to help pets and their parents surf safely through the season.

Your Dog Has Ringworm: What To Do Now

Although the name often misleads pet owners into thinking a worm has invaded their pet’s bodies, ringworm is actually a fungus that can affect the hair, skin and nails. This fungus can lead to circular patterns of hair loss and red, scabby bumps. Before you introduce another pet into your home, knowing the facts about ringworm and how to prevent the skin condition from spreading is crucial. 

Dermatophytes, fungi that feeds on protein in the skin, hair and claws, is the agent of ringworm. Infections are transmitted by contact with infected hairs from another infected pet in the environment, or through bedding, grooming tools, and even fleas. The fungus can be passed between animals and humans, but young and elderly people are more susceptible to developing the infection. Those with weak immune systems are also more prone to ringworm.

House Hunting and Moving With Your Dog





Finding a new place to live when you have a dog can be quite an undertaking. It's definitely doable, but requires some  work. And moving is stressful, no matter when or how you do it. Moving with a dog can certainly add to the day's hassles but a little preparation can make the transition a little more smoother. This guest post from Bernie The Boxer filled with tips on finding a home and prepping for moving day!

 Your lovable, tail-wagging, slobbery dog might not look like a human, but she’s a member of your family. Until you perfect your "Doggese," you’ll have to do your best anticipating her needs when house hunting, and especially on moving day itself. Here are some tips for what to look for in a new home and how to keep your dog calm on moving day:

We Love You, Hayley Girl

Our sweet Hayley girl
We lost our Hayley girl yesterday.

Many of you know the trials that Hayley has gone through over the years: her diabetes diagnosis, Cushing's disease, canine blindness. She also had a severe hypoglycemic attack a few months ago and extreme pancreatitis two years before that.

Each time we were warned that her prognosis was not good and she may not survive. Each time, we worried and prayed, and each time, she recovered.

She was the amazing Hayley, and literally nothing would keep her down. She would come home with her energy renewed and right back to her old self, lapping up her food with delight. Even after she lost most of her teeth, she still loved her food. Always in a happy mood, always running around in a quick pace, Hayley was the literal example of living life to its fullest.

This time everything was different. She started displaying neurological symptoms and all signs pointed to a brain tumor. And still, she tried her absolute best to push through and eat and walk, and there came a point when we had to let her go because Hayley, the incredibly strong and incredibly sweet girl deserved to be happy again and pain free.

Discovering A Lump On Your Pup

Django knows something is up
My daughter, Kate is an animal whisperer. Every since she was little she has always intuitively known when something was wrong with one of our pets. She always knows when Hayley's blood sugar is dipping low and she can use a snack. She knew when our Lily was feeling ill. She even knows when one of the dogs has to use the yard. 

So, of course it was Kate who discovered a smallish, golfball sized lump on Django's neck. It isn't exactly the top of her neck as much as it is the side, close to her left shoulder.

Snacktime: New Milk-Bone Farmer's Medley Dog Biscuits


I've always given my dogs treats. Usually it's an occasional thing, like when Django just will not come in because she's trying to get the attention of the cat next door. I taught her early on to always come when I say 'Get in" and she always does, no matter how excited or insane she is with the cat outside. That deserves a treat because I always want to reward her for important things and coming when I call her is a safety issue.

However, as many of you know, Django is now our model for our shop, BKLYN Handmade. Several times week, she models dog snoods and scarves, and she does so quite happily. I put the snood over her head and she runs right up to the stairs in the yard, takes a seat and looks incredibly cute while I snap photos.

She models in all kinds of weather and is so obedient and compliant, and I am so lucky she is — plus she looks imply adorable! So after every single photo shoot, I give her a treat or two.

Since it's become such a regular occurrence, I wanted to make sure that what I was giving her is healthy. I recently partnered with Milk-Bone to try out their new Farmer's Medley dog treats. They are full of great ingredients! Below are some of the questions I think about before I buy treats for my dog.

Will my dog like them?
They contain real meat and vegetables which Django loves and even though she is a picky eater at times, she very eagerly consumes bite-sized cute biscuits.

Does this treat have quality ingredients?

Milk-Bone's Farmer's Medley treats contain simple ingredients, so I can rest assured that I am giving the best product to Django. The treats are made with real US-sourced beef, chicken, turkey, or lamb and vegetables. And I am excited about the grain-free options (though Django loves the whole-grain treats, too)! I feel good about feeding these biscuits to my dog everyday.


Does it fit my budget?
Many quality dog treats can be pricey and can have you guessing if your choice was worth the big bucks.  Milk-Bone Farmer's Medley dog treats provide the same quality ingredients found in premium dog biscuits, but at an affordable price. So you don't have to worry about breaking the bank by spending a lot on premium treat options for your dog.

I would love to hear how many times you give your dogs treats, and how you go about selecting which treats to buy in the comments below.

To learn more about Milk-Bone Farmer's Medley dog treats (and where you can find them near you), head over to http://bit.ly/2lt8CSSsomepuppytolove .





6 Tips To Keep Your Dog Safe in the Winter

Winter is here and so is the cold. Here are 6 tips to avoid a chilly trip to the vet’s office!

During these winter months it can be challenging to keep our pets healthy and happy. The cold weather often brings a slew of things to watch out for when it comes to keeping Fido and Fluffy out of trouble.

Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM offers a few essentials to get your furry friend through these cold months without a trip to the vet’s office:

1. When using ice melting products like Rock salt and De-icing chemicals, spritz your pet’s feet with water when they come back inside to avoid irritation of their skin and paws. Signs of ingestion include excess drooling, depression and vomiting.

2. Antifreeze is deadly for pets. Clean up spills/leaks immediately and make sure that it is stored in a sealed container locked in a secured cabinet. If you think your pet has consumed anti-freeze, this is a true life or death emergency! Go to your vet ASAP and call ahead while you are on your way!

3. Keep your pets protected from the frigid temperatures (if it’s too cold for you, it’s too cold for your pet. Offer a little extra food during the winter months because more calories are burned trying to maintain body heat)

4. Frost bite risk areas include your pet’s ears, nose, tip of the tail and ears. Frostbitten areas of skin initially turn a reddish color then become gray.  To treat frostbite: give your pet a warm bath and wrap him or her up in warm towels. Don’t rub an area that has frostbite!

5. Homemade meals for your pet are a healthy and cost effective way to ensure your pet is getting essential nutrients without the risk of indigestion, weight gain due to over eating and the high caloric intake of processed foods. Cuisine made of equal portions of a lean protein (chicken, turkey, beef, veal, duck, fish or eggs), long-acting carbohydrates (potatoes, rice, pasta or oatmeal) and fresh vegetables (broccoli, spinach, green beans, lima beans, peas and carrots) are ideal. Cats require more protein than dogs, so 80 percent lean protein and 20 percent veggies is perfect.

6. Rat and Mouse baits are usually used more often in cold weather. Place baits in areas inaccessible to your pets. Peanut butter baits smell good and are tasty to pets. Save labels, and if you think bait has been eaten by your pet, get to your vet ASAP. Call ahead while you are on your way! Most pets are treated with Vitamin K therapy and recover.

Dr. Carol Osborne is an author and world-renowned integrative veterinarian of twenty plus years. After graduating from the Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Carol completed a prestigious internship at the Columbus Zoo.  Shortly afterwards, she launched a very successful private practice and became founder and director of the non-profit organization, the American Pet Institute. Dr. Carol offers traditional veterinary care for dogs and cats with a softer, natural touch. Her approach highlights the importance of nutrition and utilizing holistic avenues in combination with traditional treatments.






Keep Your Dog Safe With These Holiday Safety Tips!

  


‘Tis the season for putting up decorations and eating delicious holiday treats, but that also means pets could be getting into serious trouble!

Trupanion, a leading provider of medical insurance for cats and dogs, sees a 10% increase in foreign body ingestion claims and a 24% increase in toxicity claims during the holiday months each year.

But you can keep your pets safe this holiday season with the below tips from Dr. Sarah Nold:

Top Dog Names

From Twilight and Game of Thrones to Grey’s Anatomy, it’s no secret that pop culture provides us with an endless amount of inspiration for naming our furry friends.

But what dog names rank in the top 10

DogVacay, the most popular pet sitting service in the U.S. and Canada with more than 35,000 vetted hosts booking millions of overnights a year, uncovered the top dog names, which you can see in the infographic below. Here are some of the interesting findings from this year's list:

10 Reasons Why You Should Rescue A Dog Instead of Buying One

Everyday there are countless, gorgeous and loving animals available in local shelters, yet when many people considering getting a dog, they think of buying one from a store first. I would like to change that.

The first step is awareness. Some people just do not realize what a great dog they can find in a shelter or how they will be saving their lives (not to mention helping put the stores which profit from puppy mills out of business!).

My Hayley and Django were both adopted and they are the sweetest animals in the world! I am so lucky to have been able to find them.