July 4th Dog Safety Tips

Oh, July 4th… while we humans look forward to barbecues and fireworks, it remains a day that many of our precious pups dread. The houseguests, hot temperatures, and noisy bottle rockets can drive some dogs into a panic. 

On top of that, my dogs usually won’t use the yard to relieve themselves between the hours of about 6pm until whenever the big bangs are over which can be anywhere from 1-4am. But still, they’d much rather hold it than go outside.



More than being uncomfortable, July 4th is the day —more than all others during the year— that dogs get lost. It’s also a day that many dogs get injured.
The loud fireworks scare many dogs and that combined with have company over and distracted owners, is a recipe for disaster. The top three breeds that run away are Labrador Retrievers, Chihuahuas and the Pit Bulls. Above all, make plans for your dog before guests arrive. Try to keep him in a gated area where he can see people but cannot get out. Or if she is an anxious type, consider keeping her in a quiet, but cool bedroom and make it a point to check on her regularly (or have a family member take on this task).

Here are some more tips from Found Animals (an independently funded nonprofit working to find the big ideas that reduce euthanasia in shelters):

ASPCA Urges the U.S. Sentencing Commission to #GetTough on Dog Fighting


NEW YORK— Following today’s commendable decision by the U.S. Sentencing Commission (USSC) to consider revising the federal sentencing guidelines for animal fighting, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is launching a campaign -- including a compelling new video -- urging the public to actively support stronger sentencing guidelines.

The current sentencing guidelines do not reflect the maximum penalty allowed under federal law, which can discourage federal prosecutors from pursuing animal fighting charges that may only yield a sentence as paltry as six months in jail.

“The current guidelines for dog fighting are woefully inadequate, and don’t come close to matching the heightened seriousness with which Congress, law enforcement, and the public view this barbaric activity,” said Matt Bershadker, ASPCA President & CEO. “By proposing to amend the animal fighting guidelines, the U.S. Sentencing Commission moves us one step closer to giving judges the tools they need to punish these criminals more appropriately, as well as to deter potential criminals.”

In 2008, Congress acknowledged the depravity of dog fighting by increasing the maximum penalty for participating in animal fighting from 3 to 5 years. They again strengthened animal fighting statutes a few years later when they made attending an animal fight a federal offense and added additional penalties for bringing a child. However, federal sentencing guidelines have not been updated to include these increased penalties, creating a discrepancy between what is allowed under federal law and what is expressed in sentencing guidelines. As a result, convicted dog fighters are receiving unacceptably weak sentences.


How To Prepare For Your Dog’s Death

For many of us, the connection we share with companion animals extends beyond just friendly company; our pets are considered a part of the family. The truly unique love between an owner and their pet is something one has to experience to understand. Although a pet may be a very loved and important family member, it is important to be sensitive and aware of your pet’s needs as they age.

Sometimes owners are faced with difficult decisions when their pet reaches an age or health condition that no longer allows them to enjoy daily activities. Dr. Sarah Griffin, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM), explains that euthanization is never an easy choice, but in some cases, it may be the best option for your pet.

“One of my professors in veterinary school told us that she tells clients to pick the pet’s three favorite things,” Griffin said. “When two out of three of those things are gone, it’s time to let them go. Many pets will continue to eat and drink even when they are in pain. Keeping a daily record of good vs. bad days sometimes helps you see the quality of life they are living.”

Some of the emotional struggles owners face when dealing with their pet’s death may be guilt and loneliness. An owner may have made the mistake of letting their pet outdoors to play with other animals, resulting in a fight or attack. Getting hit by a car is another danger owners face when letting their pets play outside. Some owners may even feel guilt for their pet’s death because they did not take them to the veterinarian after discovering symptoms of a potential disease or sickness. Whatever the case may be, many owners also suffer from loneliness after the loss of their pet.

“Pets are a part of our families. Recognizing the way you handle grief is important,” Griffin explained. “The first step in working through a pet’s death is acknowledging the way you feel. Share your feelings with close friends and family so they can support and encourage you.”

PetSmart Giveaway! #InspiredbyCraft Hill's Ideal Balance

Hayley's continued good health fully depends on her food
 This post is sponsored by Hill’s. I am being compensated for helping spread the word about Hill’s® Ideal Balance® CRAFTED, but Some Puppy To Love only shares information we feel is relevant to our readers. Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Inc. is not responsible for the content of this article.

I was watching a movie last night in which a couple went to a Japanese restaurant. It was one of the places where the chef cooks everything right in front of you. I often wish that we could see up close and personal exactly what goes into  all our food and our dogs' food. 

Well, if you feed your dog Hill's Ideal Balance™ Crafted® pet foods, you will actually do know specifically what is in it. All Hill's products are made in the U.S. from only natural ingredients with no corn, wheat or soy, which is something most dog owners seek out when purchasing food. In addition, their cooking process is clear, slow, and wholesome.

Warm Weather Means Increased Parasite Danger for Dogs

Among these six parasites, heartworms are the most dreaded. “Heartworm disease is now found in every state in the U.S., and it only takes one bite from an infected mosquito to spread the disease to your pet,” notes Dr. Stephen Jones, veterinarian and president of the American Heartworm Society. “Unfortunately, there are still millions of pet owners who don’t give their pets heartworm preventatives, and we estimate there are one million pets that have this potentially deadly disease. This is a reminder to have our pets tested annually and to give heartworm prevention year round.”  

Spring has arrived and so have parasites. Warm weather draws families outdoors for gardening, hiking, camping, picnicking, and other activities. While it’s easy to see flowers blooming, parasites are virtually invisible, emerging in full force during this time, but remaining a year-round threat.  

Here’s what every dog owner needs to know about these six parasites:

10 Ways To Stand Up For Animals!

10 Ways To Help Animals Right Now!

Dogs, cats, birds, hamsters, and even wild animals like lions, bears, elephants … and every existing living animal in the world are not very different from you and I. They all have the right to live without fear of being hunted, tortured or abused.

In our own homes, there is a reason that so many of us animal lovers treat our pets in the same way we treat our children, and why many of us consider them part of our family. Like children, dogs and cats need our protection, period. They are fully dependent on us for food, good health and safety.

My hope for our world is that we, collectively as a society realize that animals need our protection and that we work together to ensure that animals are treated with care, become vigilant about animal abuse in any shape or form, and punish those who harm animals in any way.

Nobel Peace Prize winner archbishop Desmond Tutu released a statement on animal welfare which was part of a foreword for the Global Guide to Animal Protection. In it, he wrote:

There are other issues of justice–not only for human beings but also for the world’s other sentient creatures. The matter of the abuse and cruelty we inflict on other animals has to fight for our attention in what sometimes seems an already overfull moral agenda. It is vital, however, that these instances of injustice not be overlooked.

I have seen firsthand how injustice gets overlooked when the victims are powerless or vulnerable, when they have no one to speak up for them and no means of representing themselves to a higher authority. Animals are in precisely that position. Unless we are mindful of their interests and speak out loudly on their behalf, abuse and cruelty go unchallenged.